DJ Sam Isaac has been an integral and influential part of the creativity involved with moving a crowd. From his upbringing in Manhattan where he gained most of his love and appreciation for music to his relocation and musical coming of age in the SF Bay Area, Sam has been dedicated to inspiring those he plays for.
Over the last 15 years Dj Sam Isaac has rocked venues and clubs throughout the Bay Area and beyond, opening for acts like Common, The Roots, Wyclef, and Cake, and playing in venues in San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Prague.
Today, Dj Sam Isaac is known for the assorted brand of music he plays and his interactive style. Sam is often moving as much as the crowds he plays for. He can be found at spots in San Francisco like Harlot, Vessel, 330 Ritch, The Ambassador, Manor West and more. Expect to hear everything from 80’s to Electronic, hip hop to rock blended in a unique style. Don’t be surprised to hear Nina Simone, to LMFAO to the Notorious B.I.G. And come ready to be inspired to move.

DJ Sam Isaac has been an integral and influential part of the creativity involved with moving a crowd. From his upbringing in Manhattan where he gained most of his love and appreciation for music to his relocation and musical coming of age in the SF Bay Area, Sam has been dedicated to inspiring those he plays for.

Over the last 15 years Dj Sam Isaac has rocked venues and clubs throughout the Bay Area and beyond, opening for acts like Common, The Roots, Wyclef, and Cake, and playing in venues in San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Prague.

Today, Dj Sam Isaac is known for the assorted brand of music he plays and his interactive style. Sam is often moving as much as the crowds he plays for. He can be found at spots in San Francisco like Harlot, Vessel, 330 Ritch, The Ambassador, Manor West and more. Expect to hear everything from 80’s to Electronic, hip hop to rock blended in a unique style. Don’t be surprised to hear Nina Simone, to LMFAO to the Notorious B.I.G. And come ready to be inspired to move.

NYE 2012 with Anderson & Nick - Harlot SF www.harlotsf.com

NYE 2012 with Anderson & Nick - Harlot SF www.harlotsf.com

3rd Fridays at Parlor - Holiday Bash hosted by Justin Roja, Tom Roche with DJ Sam Isaac & DJ Solomon

3rd Fridays at Parlor - Holiday Bash hosted by Justin Roja, Tom Roche with DJ Sam Isaac & DJ Solomon

Infusion Lounge SF with Brooke Hogan

Infusion Lounge SF with Brooke Hogan

SF Allstars - Ongoing at Vessel SF

SF Allstars - Ongoing at Vessel SF

Halloween 2010

Halloween 2010

NYE 2011 with DJ D Ro at the Clift Hotel.

NYE 2011 with DJ D Ro at the Clift Hotel.

Happy 5th of May!!!

Happy 5th of May!!!

Hip Hop Music

Where has it gone? I grew up on the upper west side of Manhattan in the 80’s and early 90’s before relocating to the San Francisco Bay Area. Hip Hop music and culture had been around for many years before I fell in love. In the late 80’s it seems like it took on a new life. It was a snowball rolling down a hill getting bigger, faster and more unstoppable as it progressed. Groups like Public Enemy and NWA were making noise in the media for their political and revolutionary views. Finally young people who until then didn’t have a voice, suddenly had a booming megaphone to say that they were here and that they mattered. Groups like De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, Gangstarr, and Brand Nubian were pushing the limits of musicianship and creativity and blazing new trails when it came to making records. On the west coast kids from Oakland like Del and Souls of Mischief and cats from Los Angels like Cypress Hill or King T and the Liks were doing their thing and bookending this bourgeoning world of hip hop. It was beautiful. Yo! MTV Raps was like the church that I would run home to every afternoon to see what dope new record or group was out next. It was beautiful…

Then something changed. It wasn’t suddenly, but gradually the music and message and feeling changed. Some might point to Puffy and Bad Boy. Others might say that Suge had a hand in things. All I know is that slowly hip hop lost it’s luster. It was being used to promote corporations, and sounded tarnished. It felt like people with less talent than before were making it big with a watered down product. Don’t get me wrong, there was plenty of good music coming out, and there were some really talented producers and musicians who shone through, but as a whole it was becoming dimmer. With the late 90’s, house blew up. Then hip hop in it’s commercial form made a comeback. Now Electro and Dub Step is the thing. Who knows what’s next?

I miss the way it felt. Every now and again I’ll put on a Main Source record or something from Nice N Smooth will come on and it makes me smile. It makes me proud to know that I was around when hip hop meant something. It was like a fresh pair of kicks right out of the box. Now they’re grungy and old, and smell. They still work, but they’re not the same.  Like Red from The Shawshank Redemption says when speaking about Andy Dufrain “I guess I just miss my friend.”